It’s been a crazy and hectic start to the New Year. I’m half way through the first year of a new job and I remind myself daily that it’s a marathon not a sprint. Then I laugh to myself. I actually prefer sprinting to long distances, so what was I thinking in taking a new job. More than a few times I wonder why I would choose to try something new, rather than stay with the more predictable job I’ve had for several years.

The reality is that I outgrew that job something ago and while my home life was so challenging, predictable was more convenient (or so I told myself). Ask my wife and she can tell you stories. There were so many nights I came home feeling frustrated, unappreciated, and bored. Without realizing it, I placed a variety of obstacles in my way, allowing myself to play it safe. Why risk failure in a new job or being out of my element, to having a fair amount of knowledge at work and the experience to back it up? Let’s face it, finally having answers and some ‘expertise’ felt pretty good.

Fortunately or unfortunately though, it was time for a change. I did take a chance and I have learned some important lessons in the past seven months:

  • I am out of my element more often than not. I cling to mindfulness meditation literature as my guide to simply accepting the feelings this creates. I am by no means an expert of mindfulness or meditation, but I am grateful for a way to practice being in the moment.
  •  People are not eager to accept the new person. I am now very aware of the many times I didn’t support ‘the new person’ or offer them assistance. Sometimes a warm smile is all it takes to make me feel welcomed.
  • Knowledge comes in many forms and in surprising ways (be prepared to accept it). When you don’t have many resources, it’s amazing to discover information and knowledge in rather unsuspecting ways. I have met some very wise and helpful people willing to offer me assistance. 
  • I can’t do everything (and I really don’t want to try). I am fortunate to work with a talented group of people who have a variety of skills. My responsibility is to recognize their skills and make space for them to do what they do best. 
  • I am where I am and that’s good enough. It’s rather humbling and quite simple. I am where I am and that’s good enough. “Gratitude turns what we have into enough.” Author Unknown
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