All rights owned by Holly K. Robinson

All rights owned by Holly K. Robinson


There are some parents that would move heaven and earth to see their kids play in every single event. Whether it be theater, music, sports, etc., many parents want to watch every. single. moment.

I get that. I’m one of those moms. Our children grow ridiculously fast and it pains us parents to think about missing moments, especially big ones.

I want to be on the sidelines to cheer for my boy and his team. I want to help motivate him/them when the going gets tough. I want to watch the great moments and carve them into my brain so I can remind him of this when he’s older.

But I’m ready to take a step back.

Reason # 1 – Me

I am a mom. I have a job. I’m the primary breadwinner. I drive 60-80 minutes each way to work and work 8+ hour days. I am on our city board of education. I am on other volunteer boards in our area. I play golf and co-ed softball (sometimes). I blog for CTWorkingMoms. I have friends that I try to help and spend some time with occasionally. I want to do all of these other things. And I want to be able to focus my best energy and full attention at all of these other things. That means, sometimes things have to give. I cannot leave work 60-90 minutes early every time my kid has a game. I cannot blow of meetings or other responsibilities for every single practice or game.


Reason # 2 – Him

I’m slightly competitive. I definitely find it difficult to stay quiet, either with encouragement or admonishment. I want to help him focus, I want to guide him, I want to lift him up, but… it’s not about me.

This is his time. This is his game. These are his moments on that field, not mine.

I don’t think I’m helping. I don’t think I’m really helping him focus or encouraging him. Plus, he has assured me that he’s totally okay with me not being there. I don’t think he cares less if we’re watching him or not.

I was once a competitive athlete. My parents were not at every game, sometimes they even missed the big ones. I honestly don’t remember if they even were able to make it to a single event when I played D-I in college. I was quite fine with it, because I needed to focus on my game, not looking over at the sidelines for their approval.

I won’t let every other part of my life suffer to be there on the sidelines (unless, of course, he wants me there). There will be times when other baseball moms will drive him to and/or from games. They will text me when he makes a great play or, God forbid, call me if he gets hurt. I’m going to be okay with that. I’m going to be okay missing those moments and I’m pretty sure he’ll be okay with us missing them too.