Being forgiving with ourselves

Apr 18, 2014 by

Hi my name is Christa an I’m a Pinterest addict.

I love taking a moment here and there throughout the day (perhaps if my daughter naps) to cull through pins and find inspiration. I have boards about everything from style to recipes to activities to do with my daughter.

Lately I thought I was very much in the middle of a parenting rut. I was feeling very tired. Not even lazy, exactly, I just had zero energy. When it’s my job to be home with my daughter all day it’s easy to feel as if not doing that job as a parent if every moment of her day isn’t enriching.

The importance of pausing

Apr 11, 2014 by

Sometimes it feels like all you do with young kids is run…and run…and run.

Other times, they can be the perfect reminders to just slow down.

This week, while distractedly rushing through the store, trying to adhere to some arbitrary schedule (we really weren’t crunched for time that day) my daughter literally asked me to stop and smell the roses. And they were lovely.

"You do it too, Mommy." Photo credit C.Allard

“You do it too, Mommy.”
Photo credit C.Allard

This past weekend, while pulling her out of the car after an unusual late night out, I was again rushing, needing to get her to bed. My daughter noticed the crescent moon and pointed it out. We stopped. The sky was clear and beautiful, and there were so many stars surrounding the moon. We stood there and she just looked in awe. For all my hustling I would have missed how peaceful the sky was that night, if not for her.

The moments that matter

Apr 4, 2014 by

Typically, if you were to see a blog post, with a title like this, you’d read on about cherishing the little things in parenthood; about pushing aside the frustrations of the day to hold on to the sweetness that inevitably finds its way into even in the hardest parts of parenting.

But this is not that post. Mamas, sometimes the moments that matter most are the ones that make you feel…normal.

Maybe normal is the wrong word, but it’s the one I’ve been using lately. I know that motherhood is my new normal, and it’s something I’m incredibly proud of. Insert here the blogger caveat about how much I love my daughter and how I wouldn’t change having her for anything. But lately I’ve been equating finding moments of balance in my life with feeling “normal;” like I haven’t lost all of my pre-parenthood self.

Maintaining your sanity in one not-too-convenient-and-not-widely-understood step

Mar 28, 2014 by

If you follow the blog, then you know that I’ve confessed before that I drive my daughter around town every day to get her to nap. Yep, every day. This is one of my biggest judgement free parenting points – I realize that this doesn’t work for so many parents; I’ve been told before that I’m ridiculous, that I coddle my daughter too much, that I let her call the shots. I get that I have the “luxury” of being around in the afternoon on weekdays to even have the option of driving her around for a nap. But despite recognizing that, my daughter still very much needs a daily nap to function well, and knowing that it’s developmentally appropriate for toddlers her age to still nap every day, I’ve come to realize one of the biggest reasons that I continue to hop into my car every day for nap time is because I need the break in the day as much as she does.

Breaking Routine

Mar 21, 2014 by

Parents of toddlers know the importance of standing our ground; of being consistent; of routine; of not being a pushover. It’s our leg to stand on. It makes us credible. And it WORKS.

Knowing what to expect next gives toddlers a sense of control when they are so often the ones being controlled (and rightly so, those wee little humans). I see it daily even in the small ways, like in how many times my daughter *needs* to watch Frozen in any given week. Memorizing the plot, the lines, the lyrics…it gives her a sense of comfort to know what’s coming up next in her very unpredictable world.

Toddlers thrive on routine, even though they often fight it. Every toddler ever is trying to also moonlight as a master manipulator. Somewhere around the age of two they magically learn the art of negotiation, and resisting, and stalling. If you’re a parent to a toddler, I only need one word to illustrate my point: bedtime.

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