The Great Christmas Tree Purge

Nov 21, 2014 by

Our house isn’t teeny tiny, but it’s not huge, either. Our living space isn’t stingy for every day living (I happen to love this house) but when you need to consider a safe place to put a large tree covered in several dozen of your fragile, sentimental keepsakes, we need to get a bit creative. Our spot-of-choice for our Christmas tree is in the corner of our daughter’s play area; it’s in our main living area so we can enjoy its glow each night but out of the way enough that we aren’t tripping over it.

What this means, however, is a bit of shuffling as that space does double duty. Roughly a quarter of play space is lost for about a month, including some squares of her play mat and nearly all of our toy storage. This may sound like an inconvenience, but I can’t wait.

Whine, please

Nov 14, 2014 by

Well, we’ve made it to Friday, but what a week it’s been. My daughter has had a challenging few days and, therefore, so have I. With all of the whining, she has me reaching for my wine tonight.

Here’s just a few of the things I’ve heard tantrums over this week:

My boots are slippery.

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We’re headed the right way to school.

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I can’t see your eyes through your sunglasses.

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You’re playing the song I want to hear on the radio.

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You put pants on my cousin.

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You looked at me.

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Cheers to Friday. Who’s with me?

Our connection cue

Nov 7, 2014 by

When we were breastfeeding it was easy to tell when my daughter needed to connect, and knowing how to do it was a no-brainer – we’d nurse. Any time day or night, no matter what the reason, as long as our breastfeeding relationship continued I knew just how to meet her needs and, in particular, how to reinforce that I was there for her. While the breastfeeding itself may have been hard at times, knowing when my daughter needed it was a piece of cake.

Fast forward 11 months since we’ve weaned and nothing about having a three year old is a piece of cake. Tuning in to when she needs connection now – and knowing how to respond in a way that meets hers and my needs – has been the journey I’ve been on for some time now. Yet throughout all the troubleshooting, and even without nursing, there’s one connection cue that has remained constant with all of her caregivers since my daughter was a baby: she plays with our ears.

The things I tell my daughter

Oct 31, 2014 by

Do you feel like a broken record as a parent? It’s hard not to. I say plenty of things I’m not proud of, and many things I hope my daughter forgets. There’s also plenty she misses when she chooses to ignore me.

But there are some things I tell my daughter often that I hope cuts through all the noise and that she always keeps in her heart.

Things such as:

I love you more than anything in this world. Don’t very forget it. Don’t ever doubt it.

I’ll be here when you need a hug.

We don’t intentionally hurt the people we love.

Use your words.

And finally,

Nobody loves you like I do.

What do you repeatedly tell your kids that you hope they hold close?

I hope she knows just how much I love her. Photo credit C.Allard

I hope she knows just how much I love her.
Photo credit C.Allard

The lasting benefits of breastfeeding

Oct 24, 2014 by

I miss breastfeeding my daughter. Maybe that’s why I’ve chose to start a career in lactation; not only do I simply want to be around nursing mothers, I want to help other women have the same sort of positive breastfeeding experience that I had. Nursing my girl was something I wasn’t ready to let go of for two and a half years.

I’m fortunate to spend a lot of time around my sister and her 9 month old son. They are rockstars and are still nursing on demand. Seeing them connect through nursing makes me wistful for the breastfeeding years with my daughter. My sister is meeting my nephew’s needs in this really awesome way. I found myself today, after spending the day with them, longing for that breastfeeding relationship again with my daughter.

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