Date Days

Oct 2, 2013 by

In honor of Little’s upcoming third birthday (He’s three? What?!), I took him out for the day yesterday. Just me and Little, having a date. “Did you have fun with Mama on your outing today, Little?” “It wasn’t a outing, Dada, it was a DATE.” “Well excuuuuse me.” I always take vacation the week before each of the boys’ birthdays to prepare for the epic birthday cakes (see also The Birthday Cake Bar). I don’t actually need an entire week to make a cake, though, and I really shouldn’t be serving week-old cake anyway, so last year I came up with the idea of taking each birthday boy out for some one-on-one time. It was a huge hit so I decided to make it a yearly tradition. Over the weekend I was wracking my brain, trying to come up with some amazing and memorable events to do with Little. Monday night around 10 PM I was still stressing about it and searching online for kid-friendly activities. Just about then, my mister said the most amazing thing: “Babe, he just wants to be with you.” It might as well have been a bucket of cold water over my head. Of course he does. He just wants to spend time with his Mama, have me all to himself and not have to share me with Big. Such a simple idea, but a powerful one. I immediately put down the computer, sat back and thought about Little’s favorite things: being outside and Batman. Done. Easy peasy.

A fan letter to Margaret Wise Brown

Sep 25, 2013 by

Author photo from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Wise_Brown#Biography

 

Disclaimer: Yes, I know that Margaret Wise Brown has been dead for over sixty years. Well, I actually didn’t know that until I started writing this post, but work with me here.

 

Dear Ms. Brown,

I have always had a thing for bunnies and for this I blame you.

Ha ha, nice cold open, right? Seriously, though, you are the inspiration for my love of all things cunicular. Oh sure, I have fond memories of Peter Rabbit, too, but now that I have kids of my own, Beatrix Potter has let me down. Her stories are quaint in retrospect but seriously, Mr. McGregor’s wife making Peter’s father into a pie?? How did I forget repress that part?

Sid Phillips is a Free-Range Kid

Sep 18, 2013 by

(Image added by Icysugarspike to http://pixar.wikia.com/Sid_Phillips)

 

If you don’t know who Sid Phillips is, you must not have a preschooler in the house. Sid is the bad seed kid in the first “Toy Story” movie. (He’s also the teenaged garbage man in “Toy Story 3,” which I presume is supposed to teach us that crime doesn’t pay or something. Protagonist Andy goes to college while antagonist Sid picks up garbage. I was under the impression that garbage men make good money, but I digress.)

Since my kids became obsessed with watched the movie, we’ve used Sid as an example of how not to act, a cautionary tale of why you shouldn’t be mean or break your toys. In the end (SPOILER ALERT!), Sid is scared straight when the toys come to life and threaten him. What goes around, comes around.

Lullabies that aren’t

Sep 4, 2013 by

The other night when I was putting Little down for bed, I sang him the following “lullabies:”

 “The Rainbow Connection” by Kermit

Somebody” by Depeche Mode

I Can’t Make You Love Me” by Bonnie Raitt

 

“One of these things. . . is not like the others . . . doo doo doooooo . . .”

Okay, so the Kermit song is fine. If not actually a lullaby, it’s at least a children’s song. Or at the very least, it was sung by a Muppet so it qualifies. But the others? Not so much. Go look up the lyrics to the Depeche Mode song if you are unfamiliar, it is wiggida wiggida whacked. Apparently my younger child is going to experience a world of heartache and loneliness that will start very, very early. Either that or Mama has to update her repertoire of slow songs to get it out of the 80s.

How kids see the world

Aug 28, 2013 by

One of the best things about having kids is that they make you look at the world in a whole new way. Kids have a completely different perspective on the world than adults do.

Sometimes the things that they see are scary, like the way that we see a spider on the ceiling . . .

 

. . . compared to the way that they do.

 

 

And that closet door that you left open a crack?

 

They see it as a portal to the monster world.

 

But sometimes the things that kids see are wondrous and beautiful and imaginative, like the space under the kitchen table . . .

 

. . . that becomes a train tunnel at a moment’s notice . . .

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