Tag: midwife

Five for Friday: Top Five Misconceptions About Women Who Have Homebirths

  My second “baby” turned two years old the other day. At this point in my parenting adventures, as I get further away from the last time I gave birth, I’m getting fewer questions about my homebirth experiences. But every so often, the topic does come up. I recently had bloodwork done, which I absolutely

Continue reading

Connecticut Appellate Court: Midwifery Does Not Constitute the Practice of Medicine in Normal Pregnancies

  Our State appellate court recently issued a decision in the ten-year-old saga of Albini v. Connecticut Medical Examining Board, in which the administrative agency responsible for the licensing and regulating of physicians sought to prevent two certified professional midwives from engaging in activity that it claimed constituted the practice of medicine without a license.

Continue reading

Birth Trauma: Partners Experience It Too.

I’ve blogged about my two birth experiences before.  Let me first say that I have never experienced what is known as birth trauma:  a feeling akin to post-traumatic stress disorder for those women whose birth experiences were so awful and psychologically unnerving, that they can have a profound impact upon the woman marked by depression

Continue reading

FAQ: Is It Worth Having a Doula at My Homebirth?

It’s becoming more common for pregnant women and their partners to enlist the labor support services of a doula.  Many women seeking a natural childbirth believe that the emotional and physical support of a doula is crucial in the hospital setting, due to research suggesting that women with continuous support during labor are more likely to

Continue reading

Neonatal Lupus: Update

In a previous post, I talked about how I did not learn until 31 weeks gestation that my heightened level of the Ro antibody, attributable to my autoimmune condition, carries with it a slight risk (1%-5%) that the fetus will develop neonatal lupus. Of the population of babies with neonatal lupus, an even smaller group

Continue reading