Tag: motherhood

An Open Letter to the Employers of America

A good friend’s youngest son started Kindergarten this year.  She’s a stay-at-home mom and hasn’t worked outside the home since her oldest son, now 11, was born – unless you count organizing numerous PTO fundraisers, teaching Sunday school at her church, managing her family’s finances (including filing complicated income tax forms), and  balancing the countless

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Simple Pleasures of a Summer Vacation

Every summer we rent a house on Block Island for a week.  It’s only about two hours from our home, but it’s a world away.  There, it’s all about living stress-free and enjoying the simple pleasures of life.  Below are a few of my favorite mind-calming, anxiety-erasing vacation rituals. Outdoor Showers – I’m not an

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62 – 37 – 4- HIKE! The life of a Working Mother is not a Spectator Sport.

No, this isn’t a blog about football, but it is about surviving and thriving as a working mother. At 62 I’ve been married to the same wonderful man for 37 years, raised 4 beautiful daughters and am the proud grandma of 3 toddler grandsons. I’ve worked since I was 16 (as most of us have)

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Ten Important Things To Ask A Mother

Here are ten important things to ask a mother of three…well, really these questions are applicable to ANY mother. But, as a mother to three daughters under the age of five, I sometimes day-dream about the simple ways in which my friends, relatives and colleagues can help me out, give me a boost, or make a part of

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A Letter to My Friend Who Has Not Yet Had Kids: Why Having a Baby Is Totally Worth It

  If the title of this post sounds familiar, it’s because two weeks ago, I posted about a related topic, in which I admitted to my younger sister that I had glossed over the pain of being a mom and wanted to make sure she understood how difficult it can be, if that level of

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A Letter to My Younger Sister: The Amazing and Horrible Truth About Becoming a Mother

My sister is in town from Chicago this week, for a last visit to Connecticut before moving to California to take a tenure-track assistant professor position.  She is dissertating (is that a verb?) this summer to get her Ph.D. in political science.  She is 29, and I am 34.  At 29, I was getting married

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